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In this informative podcast, Dr. Jonathan Delafield-Butt of the University of Strathclyde, provides a detailed overview of his work studying early consciousness of the human mind.

Delafield-Butt’s work is especially focused on consciousness and psychological development. Delafield-Butt holds a Ph.D. in Developmental Neurobiology from the University of Edinburgh Medical School and he is a recent contributor to the celebrated book, The Infant Mind: Origins of the Social Brain. Delafield-Butt is particularly interested in the earliest stages of the human mind’s development.

Dr. Jonathan Delafield-Butt discusses his early studies in chemistry and neuroscience that led to his interest in the origins of the human mind. As he states, he sought to identify the earliest moments of consciousness and the establishment of human activity—when is movement associated directly with awareness, conscious activity.

Delafield-Butt provides a detailed analysis of the various stages of development, awareness and conscious actions. And he talks about some of the critically important research done by significant scientists working with consciousness theories in the middle of the 20th century. He explains the complexity of the cortex and provides further information on brain stem theories. And in regard to the brain, interestingly, all of our experiences are taking place through the brain stem, Delafield-Butt states. And the brain stem has associative memory.

Additionally, Delafield-Butt discusses layers, memories, and associations, including a discussion of instinct as well as problem-solving, and other areas. Ultimately, Delafield-Butt states that it is certainly true that infants do not have the same abstraction of ideas or conceptual organization, or advanced language skills but that said, they are absolutely as conscious as adults.

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