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In this important podcast, Andrew Koutnik provides a detailed analysis of cancer cachexia, explaining how this unfortunate process of muscle mass atrophy causes the death of approximately 20% of cancer patients.

Koutnik has spent many years studying nutrition and metabolism in the Metabolic Medicine Lab at the University Of South Florida Morsani College Of Medicine. In the podcast Koutnik gives a complete and thorough overview of cancer cachexia, a systemic wasting syndrome. As Koutnik explains, cancer cachexia is evidenced by a loss of skeletal muscle mass, and often fat as well, that unfortunately cannot be reversed by the usual advanced nutrition protocols. And as a result of this devastating illness, serious functional impairment can develop. Koutnik talks about inflammatory signals and he explains how the sometimes-slow process of wasting occurs.

Koutnik discusses the merits of fasting and how it impacts the body in general. And he gets specific on what ketones are and what they do in the body. He remarks upon multiple studies that provided important information on ketones and exogenous esters. Koutnik explains how a fasting scenario or lowered carbohydrate intake can turn adipose tissue into a preferred fuel, though he stresses the importance of metabolites, the intermediate products of metabolic reactions catalyzed by enzymes that occur in cells.

The researcher discusses inflammation as an underlying issue and expounds upon his theories regarding how the body grasps the information it receives in regard to wasting. Finally, Koutnik talks about past research that has been primarily rodent-based, and he states that the goal going forward is to understand those findings in the context of the human scenario, to get a better understanding and advance medical science.

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